PDF

agilon health, inc. Class Action Lawsuit - AGL

36 days left to seek lead plaintiff status

Case Summary

Investors who suffered a loss and would like to learn more, click here to contact us.

Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP has filed a class action lawsuit seeking to represent purchasers of agilon health, inc. (NYSE: AGL) common stock between April 15, 2021 and February 27, 2024, inclusive, including purchases traceable to the April 2021 initial public offering of agilon stock (the “IPO”).  Captioned Indiana Public Retirement System v. agilon health, inc., No. 24-cv-02506 (S.D.N.Y.), the agilon class action lawsuit charges agilon and certain of agilon’s top executives and directors, as well as certain underwriters of agilon’s IPO with violations of the Securities Act of 1933 and/or Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

If you suffered substantial losses and wish to serve as lead plaintiff of the agilon class action lawsuit, please provide your information in the form on this page.  You can also contact attorneys J.C. Sanchez or Jennifer N. Caringal of Robbins Geller by calling 800/449-4900 or via e-mail at info@rgrdlaw.com.  Lead plaintiff motions for the agilon class action lawsuit must be filed with the court no later than May 20, 2024.

CASE ALLEGATIONS: agilon operates healthcare networks of primary care physicians across various regional geographies.

The agilon class action lawsuit alleges that defendants throughout the Class Period and in the IPO’s offering documents made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose that: (i) agilon’s business model, purportedly focused on patient care rather than fee-for-service, was unable to provide the cost savings and the mitigation of medical expenses represented to investors; (ii) agilon’s purported historical cost savings portrayed to investors in connection with the IPO were short-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and not indicative of the cost controls and incentives ostensibly inherent in agilon’s business model; (iii) as a result of the above, agilon suffered from a material, undisclosed risk of higher utilization and medical claims rates once the short-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic waned and the providers in agilon’s network were poised to experience an upsurge in patient demand for medical services materially above the historical rate portrayed in the IPO offering documents; (iv) agilon suffered from materially higher utilization and medical claims rates throughout the Class Period as compared to prior year periods as patients who had delayed elective procedures and otherwise utilizing medical benefits during the COVID-19 pandemic sought treatment; (v) agilon’s business model, purportedly focused on patient care rather than fee-for-service, had not insulated agilon from these adverse cost trends as claimed by defendants, and agilon was in fact suffering cost trends that were up to 3x higher in key areas like specialist costs, outpatient surgeries, and Part B drugs as compared to 2022; (vi) these material, adverse cost trends were not moderating, but in fact worsening as agilon progressed through the year; (vii) agilon had suffered tens of millions of dollars in excess costs related to patient supplemental benefits and over $60 million in excess costs related to agilon’s core medical services that had not been disclosed to investors; (viii) agilon had suffered tens of millions of dollars in prior year development claims that had not been revealed to investors; (ix) agilon’s historical medical margins and adjusted EBITDA had been artificially inflated and materially misrepresented to investors; and (x) agilon’s 2023 medical margin and adjusted EBITDA guidance, its 2024 cash flow guidance, and its 2026 long-term guidance was not achievable and lacked a reasonable basis in fact.

On November 2, 2023, agilon revealed a significant deterioration in its medical margins coming in at just $108 million for the quarter, far below analyst consensus estimates, due in part to $9 million in previously unreported prior year claims.  agilon further disclosed it suffered $6 million in quarterly adjusted EBITDA, which also missed analyst estimates.  On this news, the price of agilon common stock fell more than 13%. 

Then, on January 5, 2024, agilon revealed that it had suffered  dramatically higher prior medical expenses than previously revealed and, as a result, agilon was lowering its 2023 expected medical margin to a range of $340 million to $360 million, or approximately $110 million (24%) below the already substantially reduced guidance and $200 million (36%) below agilon’s original guidance.  agilon also revealed that adjusted EBITDA had fallen to a range of $69 million to $55 million in 2023 and agilon was withdrawing its 2026 guidance, which had been reaffirmed by defendants only a month-and-a-half previously, and provided a poor 2024 outlook which included just $560 million to $600 million in medical margin and an adjusted EBITDA range of $40 million to $70 million.  On this news, the price of agilon common stock fell nearly 29%.

Finally, on February 27, 2024, agilon disclosed that its 2023 medical margin had in fact come in at just $299 million for the year – far lower than the range of $340 million to $360 million provided just a few weeks prior.  agilon also revealed: (i) an additional $38 million in net costs from the fourth quarter and $13 million in costs attributable to prior periods; (ii) a $263 million net loss for 2023 and a negative $95 million adjusted EBITDA for the year – a far cry from the “meaningful step up in profitability” to a potential $90 million adjusted EBITDA gain originally claimed by defendants during the Class Period; and (iii) agilon slashed its 2024 medical margin guidance by 27% at the midpoint to a range of $400 million to $450 million and its 2024 adjusted EBITDA guidance from a $40 million to $60 million gain to a $15 million to $60 million loss.  On this news, the price of agilon common stock fell more than 7%, further damaging investors.

The plaintiff is represented by Robbins Geller, which has extensive experience in prosecuting investor class actions including actions involving financial fraud.  You can view a copy of the complaint by clicking here.

THE LEAD PLAINTIFF PROCESS: The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 permits any investor who purchased agilon common stock during the Class Period and/or common stock pursuant and/or traceable to the IPO to seek appointment as lead plaintiff in the agilon class action lawsuit.  A lead plaintiff is generally the movant with the greatest financial interest in the relief sought by the putative class who is also typical and adequate of the putative class.  A lead plaintiff acts on behalf of all other class members in directing the agilon class action lawsuit.  The lead plaintiff can select a law firm of its choice to litigate the agilon class action lawsuit.  An investor’s ability to share in any potential future recovery is not dependent upon serving as lead plaintiff of the agilon class action lawsuit.

ABOUT ROBBINS GELLER RUDMAN & DOWD LLP: Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP is one of the world’s leading complex class action firms representing plaintiffs in securities fraud cases.  The Firm is ranked #1 on the most recent ISS Securities Class Action Services Top 50 Report for recovering more than $1.75 billion for investors in 2022 – the third year in a row Robbins Geller tops the list.  And in those three years alone, Robbins Geller recovered nearly $5.3 billion for investors, more than double the amount recovered by any other plaintiffs’ firm.  With 200 lawyers in 10 offices, Robbins Geller is one of the largest plaintiffs’ firms in the world and the Firm’s attorneys have obtained many of the largest securities class action recoveries in history, including the largest securities class action recovery ever – $7.2 billion – in In re Enron Corp. Sec. Litig.

Submit Your Information

Valid monetary value, for example, $1000.00

* indicates a required field

Main Menu